Idaho Falls Temple Open House Approaching

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Temples have been the focal point of religious activity since Moses brought the Saints out of Egypt with a high hand. The finest materials were used then and the most beautiful jewels they had were used to dress the walls inside and out in reverence to the Lord their God. The Saints of that day were in a flux of movement, therefore their temple was made with basic relocation in mind. This tradition continued until the days of David, the King of Israel.

This tradition continued until the days of David, the King of Israel. David designed the first stationary temple and his son Solomon would be allowed to build it when his reign began. From the records left behind it is obvious that both David and Solomon held the priesthood. Both of them also reverenced the vision of the temple given them and that temple was to be decorated with their finest materials available at that time and built by the finest craftsmen available.

Temples are places where sacred ordinances are performed and covenants with the Lord are made. “And Here we will build a temple,” has often heralded the selection of the sacred site where the temple would be built. Once the temple site has been selected members can then align their building sites for homes, schools, and chapels congruently in line with that site where the temple will be built. They can see it in their mind before it is ever built.

Temples are built to withstand hundreds of years of constant use insofar as the materials are available to comply with that vision. However, when a temple begins to age apostles and prophets will counsel what renovations are to be done.

Temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints have initially been built from the finest materials natively available soon after the Saints came to colonize that area. Builders of those temples imported necessary materials that would complement the building materials available locally. Artisans would emigrate to that area for the privilege of working in or on the temple for free.

The Idaho Falls Temple vision began when the valley’s first Mormon settlers arrived with the railroad in 1879. The temple was this grand architectural statement about “.. where the Church wanted to be in its next hundred years, as much as the Salt Lake Temple is a statement about where it had been for the last hundred years,” said Emily Utt, the historic sites curator for the Church History Department.Recently, the Idaho Falls had begun to show signs of aging. Consequently, Latter-day Saints in southeastern Idaho saw their Idaho Falls Idaho Temple closed in March 2015 for renovations to begin.

Recently, the Idaho Falls had begun to show signs of aging. Consequently, Latter-day Saints in southeastern Idaho saw their Idaho Falls Idaho Temple closed in March 2015 for renovations to begin.

Emily Utt explains the vision and purpose of those renovations” “We wanted this temple to still feel like it had been built in the 1940s. We didn’t want this to feel like a brand-new building.”

When a temple is renovated everything inside and outside is brought up to current specs as if the temple were being first built today. But inside and out, the vision is one of faithful restoration. For instance, inside the inner walls all the mechanical and electrical systems in the temple have been faithfully upgraded to modern safety precautions while outer walls and floors and ceilings of each room will be restored as faithfully to the original splendor lavished upon the temple.

The [temple renovation] team leaders spent countless hours of study time reviewing the historical data available on the Idaho Falls Temple. Mark Berry, a project manager for the Church said, “The architect and the design teams went back through and picked out the type of materials that [were] prevalent back in the original temple.” More than two years of extensive interior renovation were required in order to bring the temple to this stage of readiness.

The historic temple is located on the picturesque banks of the convoluted Snake River. Kevin Call is one of the many residents who grew up in the Upper Snake River Valley. “Our family has been in the valley since the turn of the century in the early 1900s. The temple has been a prominent thing for us, not only church wise but community wise. It’s been such a monument on the river, a beautiful place,” Kevin told media representatives.

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