Aqua



How To Clean A Fish Tank / Aquarium Part 1





Take a trip to the pet store in order to gather information and window shop to determine the types of fish you wish to keep in your aquarium. Carefully research these fish to ensure that they are compatible for water temperatures and P.H., as well as the food that they eat. Be careful not to put prey and predator together in the same tank. 

If you don't want the hassle of live plants, plastic is always an option. They have come along way with synthetic plants. In most cases the fish may not even notice the difference, unless of course they try to eat them. Once your tank is established and you are ready to add fish, choose your fish carefully. 

Some filters need to be replaced, while other simply need to be cleaned with water. The proper way to change water in a tank is to do it gradually. First unplug any lights and equipment before cleaning the aquarium. Change approximately one third of the water in the aquarium every one to two weeks. Water from the tap should be treated accordingly before adding to the tank and adjusted within two degrees of the aquarium. 

Mostly, they remain retracted until nightfall, when they are extended to aid in feeding habits. These tentacles will sting neighboring coral if they are close enough. Be aware of this as you position the coral in your tank and try to keep coral pieces at least 6 inches away from others. As your consider the placement. 

After all, who wouldn't want to have an underwater paradise in their living room? It may, not however, be the best choice for a beginning hobbyist. Coral reef aquariums require much more care than fresh water tanks or saltwater fish only tanks. Freshwater fish are usually hardier than marine species and therefore a little more forgiving when it comes to water acclimation. 

It would be irresponsible to attempt to house one of these creatures, unless fully educated on their care needs. Sand sharks adapt the best of all sharks to a captive environment. The types of aquariums that house these very large fish are usually public state supported aquariums. These facilities have the resources to build large enough tanks to house the sharks.